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Jack Bruce - Things We Like

Jack Bruce - Things We Like
  • Performer Jack Bruce
  • Title Things We Like
  • Date of release 1998
  • Country Russia
  • Style Free Jazz, Post Bop, Jazz-Rock
  • Label Oldis
  • Catalog number OLDIS809105
  • Other formats CD, Album, Reissue, Unofficial Release
  • Genre Jazz / Rock
  • Size MP3 1046 mb
  • Size FLAC 1023 mb
  • Rating: 4.1
  • Votes: 436

Tracklist

1Born To Be Blue4:16
2Ballad For Arthur7:31
3Over The Cliff2:49
4Statues7:24
5Hckhh Blues8:56
6Things We Like3:31
7Sam Enchanted Dick (Medley)7:20

Versions

CategoryArtistTitle (Format)LabelCategoryCountryYear
2343-033, 2343 033Jack Bruce With John McLaughlin, Dick Heckstall-Smith, Jon Hiseman Jack Bruce With John McLaughlin, Dick Heckstall-Smith, Jon Hiseman - Things We Like ‎(LP, Album)Polydor, Polydor2343-033, 2343 033UK1970
SD 33-349Jack Bruce With John McLaughlin, Dick Heckstall-Smith, Jon Hiseman Jack Bruce With John McLaughlin, Dick Heckstall-Smith, Jon Hiseman - Things We Like ‎(LP, MO)ATCO RecordsSD 33-349US1971
065 604-2Jack Bruce Things We Like ‎(CD, Album, RE, RM)Polydor065 604-2Europe2003
2310 077Jack Bruce Things We Like ‎(LP, Album)Polydor2310 077Germany1971
2343 033Jack Bruce Things We Like ‎(LP, Album, RE)RSO2343 033GermanyUnknown

Credits

  • Bass, ProducerJack Bruce
  • Design [Sleeve Design]Hamish & Gustav
  • DrumsJon Hiseman
  • GuitarJohn McLaughlin
  • Other [Sausages And Mash] – Bob Adcock
  • Photography ByRoger Brown
  • SaxophoneDick Heckstall-Smith

Notes

Recorded at I.B.C. Studios, London 1968
Лицензионное соглашение РАО №035/МЗ-98 от 08.06.98

Barcodes

  • Matrix / Runout: OLDIS809105

Video

Album

Things We Like is an instrumental jazz album by Scottish musician Jack Bruce. The album was Bruce's second solo album to be released in late 1970 in the U. early 1971 in the U. but first to be recorded, in August 1968, while he was still a member of the rock power trio Cream. Things We Like is Bruce's only instrumental album, mostly containing tunes that Bruce claims to have composed in 1955, when he was twelve years of age. The album also prominently features Bruce's technique on the double. Things We Like - Jack Bruce. Лента с персональными рекомендациями и музыкальными новинками, радио, подборки на любой вкус, удобное управление своей коллекцией. Things We Like. Jack Bruce - Things We Like 1970. To favorites 3 Download album. Listen album. Free Jazz. Jack Bruce. Listen free to Jack Bruce Things We Like Over The Cliff, Statues and more. 7 tracks 41:30. Jack Bruce born John Symon Asher Bruce on 14 May 1943 in Bishopbriggs, Lanarkshire, Scotland died 25 October 2014 in Suffolk, England was a Scottish musician and composer, known as a fou read more. Jack Bruce born John Symon Asher Bruce on 14 May 1943 in Bishopbriggs, Lanarkshire, Scotland died 25 October 2014 in Suffolk, England was a Scottish musician and composer, known as a founder member of the seminal British psychedelic read more. Things We Like is a fusion music album recording by JACK BRUCE released in 1970 on CD, LPVinyl andor cassette. Jack Bruce - double bass - Dick Heckstall-Smith - soprano saxophone, tenor saxophone - Jon Hiseman - drums - John McLaughlin - guitar. About this release. Polydor 2343 033UK. Jack Bruce With John McLaughlin, Dick Heckstall-Smith, Jon Hiseman Things We Like. Genre: Jazz , Rock. The album's original release included tracks 1-7 listed below Aging was included in Polydor's 2003 CD reissue of the album as a bonus track. The original album featured a distinctly jazz stereo mix with the drums in the right hand channel only, similar to Miles Davis's 1960s Quintet releases. The 1988 U. Polydor CD release featured a more rock-oriented mix with the drums centered, and bass and sax in the left and right channels respectively. The 2003 CD re-issue features the original jazz mix. Things We Like was recorded a few months ahead of Cream's demise in August 1968, though not released till 1970, when Jack Bruce's solo career was well underway. Since then it's become rare as hen's teeth, yet hasn't been accorded the kind of mythic status that other Britjazz albums of the era seemed to have had bestowed on them. It would be trite to suggest that jazz snobbery might be in effect would it Maybe the fact that Jack wasn't tempted to enjoy the poverty and critical hostility that was the lot of the British jazzer on a permanent basis caught t